Conway's Of Ireland

Notes


Patrick Joseph Malloy Jr

Political leader Pat Malloy Jr. dies

Malloy

A member of a prominent family, he played key roles in state and local Democratic campaigns for decades.
Patrick "Pat" Malloy Jr., a pillar of the Tulsa Democratic Party, died Monday. He was 88.
A memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. Friday at Cascia Hall's St. Rita's Chapel under the direction of Ninde Garden Funeral Home.
Malloy was born Jan. 6, 1916, in Tulsa to one of the city's best-known families. His father, Pat Malloy Sr., was one of Tulsa's first county attorneys and was appointed assistant U.S. attorney general by then-President Franklin Roosevelt.
Pat Malloy Jr. graduated from Cascia Hall in 1932. He received an undergraduate degree in 1936 and a graduate law degree in 1939, both from the University of Notre Dame.
He joined the Navy in September 1941 and spent a year as the port director at the Mers-El Kebir naval base in Algeria during World War II. He was discharged Dec. 3, 1945, with the rank of lieutenant commander.
He met his future wife, Colleen Roach, that same year.
In what was the start of a lifelong devotion to politics, Malloy ran for Tulsa mayor in 1946. He won the Democratic nomination but lost to Republican Lee Price in the general election. Malloy was appointed city prosecutor in May 1948. He held the position for two years -- losing only two jury cases -- before returning to private law practice. Also in 1948, he was publicity chairman of the Democratic Central Committee. In 1954, Malloy became the first white man to join the Tulsa Urban League. As its president from 1965 to 1967, he used his position to break down racial barriers. In 1959, Malloy, then the Tulsa County Democratic Party chairman, attempted to gain the state Democratic chairmanship but lost the election in a bitter fight that went all the way down to the precinct level. Malloy was the state campaign manager for the presidential campaigns of John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy. From 1962 to 1964, he was a regional solicitor for the U.S. Interior Department, supervising 24 attorneys in six states. He was appointed to the National Council on Crime and Delinquency's board of trustees in 1967. He presented Gov. Henry Bellmon with a council study of Oklahoma's penal institutions and parole system that recommended establishment of a state corrections board and department.. The Corrections Board became a reality in 1967, and Malloy was appointed vice president and then chairman by Gov. Dewey Bartlett. Malloy began campaigning for the Democratic nomination for the 1st District congressional seat in 1968. Part of his platform concerned the Selective Service and the draft. He argued that the system discriminated against the poor and nonscholars and should be replaced by a lottery. He collected the most initial votes in the primary but lost the nomination in a runoff election. Malloy also was a member of the Tulsa County and Oklahoma bar associations. He is survived by three sons, Pat Malloy III, Terry Malloy and Tim Malloy, all of Tulsa; a daughter, Molly Williams of Tulsa; six grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Friends are making memorial contributions to the Cascia Hall Scholarship Fund.


Colleen Katherine Roach

Malloy By Staff reports 6/18/2002
MALLOY -- Colleen Katherine, nee Roach, daughter of the late Hon. Wilfrid D. Roach and Gertrude Roach, Toronto, Canada, died at her home in Tulsa, OK on Friday, June 14, 2002. Her remains will be cremated. Colleen was raised and educated in Canada. In 1944-45 she was employed by the British Embassy in Washington, D.C., where she met and then married Pat Malloy, Jr., Commander, U.S.N. and attorney at law. Pat and his bride moved to his home town of Tulsa, OK, where they lived for 57 years. Colleen was active with the Saint Rita's Guild, associated with Cascia Hall High School, the Children's Medical Center and Museum. She worked closely with her husband, Pat, not only in his professional life, but also his political life. She and Pat were active in the presidential campaigns of both John F. Kennedy and Robert Kennedy, the gubernatorial campaigns of Governors Howard Edmondson and Dewey Bartlett. She composed and delivered a poem in honor of John Fitzgerald Kennedy at a reception for the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial Library. The poem references the "heart and soul of man," but the words reflect the heart and soul of Colleen: "I was there that bright new dawning -- I felt it break around the world. It lit at once the darkened places -- The heart
and soul of man. God grant this hopeful trumpet call Echoing around the world, Will stronger grow within each heart -- Not just flicker -- to die there." Colleen is survived by: her beloved husband, Pat Malloy, Jr.; her 4 children, Pat Malloy, III and wife, Karen, Terry Malloy and wife, Ann, Molly Williams and husband, Les and Tim Malloy; her sisters, Mrs. Terry Kelley, Mrs. Margaret George, Julianne Lyons and husband, Chisholm; her brothers, Bernard Roach and wife, June, Bill Roach and wife, Helen; her grandchildren, Holly Aduddell, Tori Yi, Leslie P. Williams, Terry Malloy, Jr., Sean Malloy and Kellie Malloy; 2 great-grandchildren, Hannah Malloy and Thatcher Aduddell. Colleen will be missed by many nieces and nephews, both in the U.S. and Canada. A Memorial service will be held at St. Rita's Chapel, Cascia Hall, Tuesday morning, June 18, 2002, at 11 a.m. Colleen was in her eighty-first year. In lieu of flowers a contribution in her name to the Cascia Hall Scholarship Fund would be appreciated. Colleen's "trumpet call" will grow stronger in each of us and not merely "die there." She gave us the best that is in us! Stanleys, 743-6271
By Staff reports


Patrick Joseph Malloy

appointed asst. US Atty General by Pres. FDR

Malloy Out
Monday, Oct. 16, 1933 Time
Top of Form 1

Bottom of Form 1
Pat Malloy, the chunky, round-faced Oklahoman who has put in four months at the Department of Justice as an Assistant Attorney General, announced last week in Washington that he was going to resign, and why.
Last August Pat Malloy blew into Grand Rapids like the prairie cyclone which killed his parents, sister & brothers
34 years ago. On his own invitation he appeared before the American Bar Association, informed its members that if the Government's war against crime was to be successful, constitutional guarantees should be suspended, local police should be Federalized, all legal technicalities which shield criminals should be swept away (TIME, Sept. 11). The A. B. A. lawyers were thrown into a professional panic until Attorney General Homer Stille Cummings arrived, disavowed his subordinate's speech, promised to deal with crime in a sound constitutional manner.
Still smarting over his humiliation at Grand Rapids, Pat Malloy showed reporters a letter signed by William Stanley, Assistant to the Attorney General, saying: "Dear Pat—I have discussed with the Attorney General your suggested discussion on the report of the criminal section of the A. B. A., which we think is all right." The letter was dated Aug. 26, four days before Assistant Attorney General Malloy delivered his controversial speech.
The Grand Rapids episode was only one of "a series of sharp differences" which had culminated in Pat Malloy's breach with his chief. Mr. Malloy said he had recommended prosecution of "a New York financier" for income tax evasion. Mr. Cummings had demurred. When the Attorney General had asked the chief of his criminal division to prosecute a Department of Justice employe for a $2,000 defalcation it was Mr. Malloy's turn to balk. His explanation: "The evidence is not strong and I refuse to use the Government to prosecute a little man while they let a big man go free." As his parting shot before leaving office, Pat Malloy declared: "I challenge Cummings to prosecute the big fellow now."
Comfortably off after 20 years in the oil business, Mr. Malloy plans a European trip with his wife, perhaps private practice in Washington when he returns. Up to last Monday, Attorney General Cummings had let his challenge lie.


THREE ARE KILLED.
SALIX, Ia., June 12. -- Three persons met death in a tornado at 5:30 o'clock last evening, after having once secured a place of safety in a cyclone cellar. After remaining in the refuge a few moments they fancied the storm had passed and emerged just as the house above them came tumbling in ruins, carrying death to three and fatal injuries to a fourth.
The dead are:
MALLOY, JOHN, a farmer
MALLOY, MRS., wife of the above
MALLOY, HARRY, aged 16
Injured:
MALLOY, BESSIE, aged 18, skull fracture, will die.
MALLOY, THOMAS, body hurt
MALLOY, PATRICK, severe bruises.
The force of the wind was sufficient to flatten fences, trees and telegraph wires so that little news of the surrounding county is obtainable.
The homes of Phil Berger, Joe Bernard and Patrick O'Neil were all reduced to kindling wood. The occupants, it is reported, all escaped serious injury. Pat Malloy, who was badly injured, tells a graphic story of the storm. He says houses, barns, live stock and human beings were sucked up by the terrible funnel-shaped cloud, the air appearing to be filled with wrecked buildings and other debris for over half a mile high.
In the Malloy family there were, besides those killed and injured, the aged father and mother of John Malloy and seven sons and one daughter, who escaped injury. These were still in the cyclone cellar, but were coming out when the house fell upon those at the entrance.
The family was at supper when the funnel-shaped cloud was first seen, and Dick Malloy told his parent to go tot he cellar. He ran to the home of Mrs. Cassell, a widow, across the road, to warn her and her seven children. He took them to the cellar and the house was whirled away, injuring no one. He had to hold one boy by the legs as he was being drawn up by the suction of the wind. But the Malloy family, across the road, only remained in the cellar about five minutes as the father suggested that the cloud was only rain. They came up and in an instant the house was demolished. The dead and injured members were scattered among the ruins.
The conductor of a freight train saw the cloud and stopped his train before it got in the storm, and when he reached the town he held his train long enough to take the injured to the hospital at Sioux City, sixteen miles distant. Wild rumors are afloat of more damage in Woodburn county, but cannot be verified.
Fort Wayne News, Fort Wayne, IN, 12 Jun 1899

Another Tornado Victim.
SIOUX CITY, Ia, June 12. -- Another name was added today to the list of victims of Sunday's tornado near Salix, Ia., Bessie Malloy, aged nineteen, dying in the hospital here. It is thought all the rest of the injured will recover.
The Nebraska State Journal, Lincoln, NE, 13 Jun 1899

Fifth Victim of the Salix Storm
Another victim of the tornado near Salix. this state, has been added to the list, Thomas Malloy dying at a Sioux City hospital of the shock to the nervous system. this makes the fifth victim, all in the Malloy family.
The Chief Reporter, Perry, IA 29 Jun 1899

A terrific windstorm, afterwards called the Salix Cyclone, struck just south of the town on June 11, 1899, at 5:30 in the afternoon. A number of homes were blown down and hundreds of head of stock were killed and crippled. Five out of nine members of the John Malloy family were killed or fatally injured when the tornado struck their home on the southeast corner of Salix. The dwellings of Mrs. Cora Hassell, Philip Burger, and Joseph Bernard were all within a circle of 300 yards, directly in the path of the twister, and were destroyed. Richard Malloy rushed Mrs. Hassell and her children to the basement, thus saving their lives.
The storm, it was estimated, cut a path about four miles long and 200 yards wide, leaving behind a trail of wrecked houses and barns, destroying grain and livestock. It blew spokes out of wagon wheels, plucked chickens of their feathers, and carried a coat out of the Malloy house, hanging it neatly on a tree. The Malloy family had just been at supper when one of the sons, Richard, said he smelled brimstone, and looking out, saw a funnel-shaped cloud in the sky. He urged the family to go into the cellar, then ran over to warn Mrs. Hassell. The other Malloys went below for a few minutes, but thinking the storm was only a cloud burst, started back upstairs. They were caught n the twister which at that moment struck and demolished their house. When a searching part located them, Mrs. Malloy's lifeless body lay on that of her husband. Within a radius of 20 feet were their children - - Tom, Pat, Fred, Harry, Bessie, and Jack. Harry died within an hour.
Just before the storm Conductor J. N. Pollock of the Sioux City and Pacific freight train No. 30, had stopped on the track a short distance from the Malloy home. When he saw the injured victims of the storm, he converted a freight car into an ambulance with the assistance of Richard Malloy and some neighbors, and then made a fast run to Sioux City. The surviving members of the family were taken to St. Joseph's Hospital. Tom and Bessie died, but fourteen-year-old Pat Malloy, who suffered a broken collarbone and back injuries, survived. This was the Patrick Malloy who became Assistant Attorney General of the United States in the spring of 1933. Unfortunately his career was brief. Malloy died in early 1934.

Tulsa World 10/9/07

Only in Oklahoma: Fearless prosecutor successful in oil business By GENE CURTIS 10/9/2007 When he stepped before a jury or made a political speech, Tulsa oilman and attorney Pat Malloy was a spellbinder.
He became known as one of the most fearless and brilliant prosecutors in the Southwest and after serving two terms as Tulsa's prosecutor, he went into the oil business.
But he probably was best known in later years because of his political activities and for a time was an assistant attorney general in Washington -- until a radical idea got him into trouble with his boss.
Born in Iowa in 1885, Malloy came to Tulsa shortly after statehood in 1907, fresh out of law school at the University of Notre Dame where he had been on the debating team and had served as president of his law class.
Malloy's forensic ability became apparent early in his career when he defeated two longtime well-known lawyers in the 1910 race for county attorney.
During the campaign, the two older lawyers arranged a series of debates between themselves and after both had their say at the first session, the crowd began to leave. Malloy got up, starting speaking and those who were mingling outside in small groups began returning inside to listen.
By the time the third meeting was held, the older lawyers had withdrawn from the debate, leaving Malloy alone with a crowded house -- and he was elected.
Malloy served two terms as prosecutor and after making an unsuccessful bid for Congress in 1914 became general counsel for the Constantin Refining Co. and later president of the concern. He became a director of the Western Refiners Association and later its president for 10 years.
Malloy organized Malloy and Co. and was in El Dorado, Ark., where he had oil producing properties, when he died of a heart attack in his sleep on Jan. 31, 1934, at the age of 49.
While he was a prosecutor, Malloy offered oratory so spellbinding that Judge Henry Hudson once threw out one of his convictions because his closing argument was too good. The judge ruled that Malloy's eloquence had so influenced the jury that the defendant was convicted in spite of the evidence.
''In all my experience in the criminal courts of the state, I never before heard such a convincing and analytical argument before a jury,'' the judge said.
The ruling was in the trial of Laura Reuter, who was charged with the May 5, 1912, slaying of her husband, Charles, as he slept in a bedroom across a hall from his wife in the Reuter house in Tulsa. She told police her husband had been killed by a burglar. Neighbors, awakened by screams from Mrs. Reuter, said they had seen a man fleeing.
She testified that she awoke when someone shined a flashlight in her face, and she heard her husband telling someone in his bedroom, ''You have got me this time but I will get you yet, damn you.'' Then, she said, she heard two gunshots, heard someone fall and saw an intruder run out of the house.
Mrs. Reuter was acquitted in a retrial.
Malloy was an early supporter of Franklin Roosevelt in his first presidential race and it was expected that he would be appointed as assistant secretary of the interior. But when he didn't get that job, Attorney General Homer Cummings named him an assistant in charge of criminal prosecutions, thanks to the personal support of FDR.
It wasn't long before Malloy's outspoken habit got him in trouble with his superiors.
Speaking at a meeting of the American Bar Association in Grand Rapids, Mich., in August 1933, Malloy proposed that every law enforcement officer in the country receive a federal commission to provide the coordination needed between local, state and federal officers in their battle against the growing number of kidnappings.
Cummings repudiated the speech after a flood of protests from lawyers and states' rights Democrats. And Malloy resigned and returned to the oil business.

also had apparent infant child that died...from Tulsa Gen Society

MALLOY. PAT. lawyer, Tulsa. born Salix, Iowa, January 7, 1885, son of John and Kale (Gibbons) Malloy. Educated at Joseph's, Salix, Iowa, and University of Indiana, at Notre Damt j : ;ulniitti>il to bar in Oklahoma,. February 20, 1!i(is. served two trims as county attorney of Tulsa county Is a Democrat. Won praise from the bench in prosecuting murder trial; and defendant was granted new trial on ground that jury returned verdict under spell of Mr. Malloy's argument rather than n facts based on evi- dence. Leading lawyers claim speech was greatest ever delivered in the west. Mr. Malloy was left an orphan at tin- ain- of 14, a cyclone at Salix. Iowa, having killed bis father, mother. two brothers and a sister. Mem- ber the Elks, and ha.- been <:illtd i lironiihout the central west to deliver addresses at Memorial services. Was two years state deputy Knights of Columbus of Oklahoma and for four years has been national delegate from Oklahoma. Is now delegate to National Bar Association from Okla- homa. Married October 5. 1910. to Miss I.enore Harrington, of Sioux City, Iowa. Two rhildivn: John, :.': Pat. Jr.. 4 months.


PAT MALLOY. Pat Malloy, a lawyer and orator of distinguished ability, is now the general counsel of the Constantin Refining Company, one of the largest corporations of this character in the world. In a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability he has steadily worked his way upward to the position of leadership in which he is now found. Mr. Malloy is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Salix, January 7. 1885, his parents being John and Kate (Gibbons) Malloy. He pursued his education in St. Joseph's Academy of Salix, Iowa, and in Notre Dame University of Indiana, from which he was grad- uated. At the present writing, in 192 1, he is president of the alumni association of the university. Having carefully prepared for a professional career, Mr. Malloy was admitted to the bar of Oklahoma on the 20th of February, 1908, and entered at once upon the active practice of his profession. He served for two terms as county attorney of Tulsa county, being elected to the position on the democratic ticket. He won high praise from the bench in the prosecution of a murder trial and the defendant was afterward granted a new trial on the ground that the jury returned a verdict under the spell of Mr. Malloy 's argument rather than upon facts based in the evidence. Leading lawyers of this section of the country claim that it was the greatest speech ever delivered in the west. Mr. Malloy is largely a self-educated as well as a self-made man. He was left an orphan at the age of fourteen years, both his father and his mother meeting death in a cyclone at Salix, Iowa, which also carried off two of his brothers and a sister. Though early thrown upon his own resources, he has wisely used his tal- ents and his opportunities and step by step he has advanced. Following his admis- sion to the bar his progress has been continuous, notwithstanding that advancement at the bar is proverbially slow. He has ever prepared his cases with great thor- oughness and care and every statement that he makes is made in a convincing way that leaves no doubt as to the correctness of his position nor as to the logic of his conclusions. He is now the general counsel for the great Constantin Re- fining Company, one of the largest in the world, and is displaying in corporation practice ability equal to that which he early manifested in connection with criminal law. On the 5th of October, 1910, Mr. Malloy was married to Lenore Harrington of Sioux City, Iowa, and they have become parents of two children, John and Pat. aged, respectively, seven and five years. Mr. Malloy was for two years state deputy of the Knights of Columbus of Oklahoma and for many years has been national delegate from this state. Fraternally he is also connected with the Benev- olent and Protective Order of Elks and has been called to all parts of the middle west to deliver addresses at memorial services and on other public occasions. He seems never at a loss for a word and always to have chosen the right word, being a most fluent speaker and one who at all times carries conviction to the minds of his hearers.

PAT MALLOY. Pat Malloy, a lawyer and orator of distinguished ability, is now the general counsel of the Constantin Refining Company, one of the largest corporations of this character in the world. In a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability he has steadily worked his way upward to the position of leadership in which he is now found. Mr. Malloy is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred in Salix, January 7. 1885, his parents being John and Kate (Gibbons) Malloy. He pursued his education in St. Joseph's Academy of Salix, Iowa, and in Notre Dame University of Indiana, from which he was grad- uated. At the present writing, in 192 1, he is president of the alumni association of the university. Having carefully prepared for a professional career, Mr. Malloy was admitted to the bar of Oklahoma on the 20th of February, 1908, and entered at once upon the active practice of his profession. He served for two terms as county attorney of Tulsa county, being elected to the position on the democratic ticket. He won high praise from the bench in the prosecution of a murder trial and the defendant was afterward granted a new trial on the ground that the jury returned a verdict under the spell of Mr. Malloy 's argument rather than upon facts based in the evidence. Leading lawyers of this section of the country claim that it was the greatest speech ever delivered in the west. Mr. Malloy is largely a self-educated as well as a self-made man. He was left an orphan at the age of fourteen years, both his father and his mother meeting death in a cyclone at Salix, Iowa, which also carried off two of his brothers and a sister. Though early thrown upon his own resources, he has wisely used his tal- ents and his opportunities and step by step he has advanced. Following his admis- sion to the bar his progress has been continuous, notwithstanding that advancement at the bar is proverbially slow. He has ever prepared his cases with great thor- oughness and care and every statement that he makes is made in a convincing way that leaves no doubt as to the correctness of his position nor as to the logic of his conclusions. He is now the general counsel for the great Constantin Re- fining Company, one of the largest in the world, and is displaying in corporation practice ability equal to that which he early manifested in connection with criminal law. On the 5th of October, 1910, Mr. Malloy was married to Lenore Harrington of Sioux City, Iowa, and they have become parents of two children, John and Pat. aged, respectively, seven and five years. Mr. Malloy was for two years state deputy of the Knights of Columbus of Oklahoma and for many years has been national delegate from this state. Fraternally he is also connected with the Benev- olent and Protective Order of Elks and has been called to all parts of the middle west to deliver addresses at memorial services and on other public occasions. He seems never at a loss for a word and always to have chosen the right word, being a most fluent speaker and one who at all times carries conviction to the minds of his hearers.


Lenore Harrington

Lenne in 1930 census


Joseph H Griggs

father from Va, mother NC
In 1850 census this family was in Dade cty MO with a son William b 1848 in Mo


Elvena (Jemima) G Brown

parents from Va. Elvena in cem, Jemima from census.
married...December 23, Joseph H. Griggs and Elvina G. Brown, by P. B. Marple, M.P.


Harris R Griggs

this may be Horace Robin Griggs who m Harriett Ann Daubin , son Horace Ira Griggs b 10/19/1893
Mendota, Fresno Ca
Harris R in 1880 census